Gary Guinn

Literature of the Ozarks

Month: March 2017 (page 1 of 2)

Characters as Aristotle Saw Them, from Michael Tierno’s Book Aristotle’s Poetics for Screenwriters

The book Aristotle’s Poetics for Screenwriters, by Michael Tierno, was featured recently on Delanceyplace.com , an excellent site for the curious among us. And the excerpt ,which gives Aristotle’s thoughts on creating good characters in fiction, is a perfect follow-up to the series of posts I’ve been doing on characterization in fiction.
From Aristotle’s Poetics for Screenwriters, by Michael Tierno.
The Greek philosopher Aristotle’s book Poetics has given countless writers a guidepost for creating great fiction:
“One  of  the  many  things  we  can  thank  Aristotle  for  is  his  writings  on  how  to  create  characters  that  seem both realistic and able to captivate an audience. First, make them good enough that we can root for them. Second, make them ‘appropriate,’ meaning give them characteristics that make sense for the type of person they are. Third, make them human — give them flaws or quirks that make us believe that they exist. Finally, whatever characteristics you do give them, make sure you keep them there throughout the length of the screenplay. As Aristotle says, make sure they are ‘con­sistently inconsistent.’…
“Additionally, he gives us five principles of life that we can use to create character in our stories:
  1. Nutritive Life
  2. Desiring Life
  3. Sensitive Life
  4. Locomotion
  5. Capacity for Rational Thought
“Because these five principles all belong to the makeup of a real-life person’s ‘psychology,’ they can be used to create convincing three-dimensional characters. Let’s examine each one.

1. Nutritive Life. Do you wonder about your characters’ eating habits? Wouldn’t that tell you (and your audi­ence) a lot about them? Don’t your eating habits say a lot about you? You should brainstorm as much as you can to get a clear picture of what the eating habits of your characters might be, to gather clues about who they are. How do they eat, what do they eat? Do they think about food a lot? What do your characters’ refrigerators look like? Not that any of this ever has to make it to the page, but it’s a window into their character. I mean, when Rocky gets up at 4 a.m, and drinks four raw eggs, isn’t that worth a gazillion pages of psychological notes on him? That image is so powerful and evocative that you know without further elaboration that he is serious about this boxing match. Look at Lester Burnham [in the Oscar-winning American Beauty]. What does he eat? By the end of his transformation from mis­erable mid-life-crisis guy to seeker of eternal youth, he’s blending and drinking health drinks. What could tell us more about Lester’s new attitude toward life? What could make Lester seem more human?

Roman bust of Aristotle

Roman copy in marble of a Greek bronze bust of Aristotle by Lysippus, c. 330 BC

2.  Desiring Life. At the heart of all action is the desire of the hero. Basic human desire is really what makes char­acters come alive on the screen. In The Godfather, when Michael Corleone goes to Italy and falls in love with an Italian woman from the mountains, doesn’t that make him seem truly alive? It’s a probable incident that flows with the action, reflecting his deep commitment to his Italian ‘roots.’ In Gladiator, Maximus yearns to go home to his family and, after they have been murdered, to join them in eternity. In The Blair Witch Project, the kids’ ambition to tape the Blair Witch and make a film leads them to their death. Desiring is at the heart of what it means to be a living, breathing human being.

3.  Sensitive Life. It goes without saying that our five senses are a big part of being alive. If a human being faces the prospect of losing sight or hearing, it’s devas­tating. In fact, all of the five senses — sight, hearing, touch, smell, and taste — define our lives at the most ba­sic level. Lester Burnham spends a lot of time mastur­bating, doesn’t he? In fact, it’s how we are first introduced to him. What more do we need to sense that Lester is real and to ‘know’ who he is? In cinema, perhaps the most important sense in regard to character development is visual perception. Great screenwriters know how to feed information to the audience through the eyes of characters, such as when Lester sees Angela at the pep rally and fantasizes about her. Showing how characters actually see things with their own eyes ena­bles the audience to experience ’causes’ of the action.

It also puts to use a powerful aspect of the cinematic medium, which is the hero’s literal point of view.
4.  Locomotion. Carefully depicting movement is vital to a screenplay. For example, The Blair Witch Project is a tapestry of rest and locomotion, in which the characters’ use of their eyes and ears is also notably important. Heather, the lead character in the story, spends a lot of time running around, screaming, and trying to videotape the ground in front of her. The lifelike aspect of all the characters is transmitted largely by their physical move­ment, as they trudge through the woods.
5.  Capacity for Rational Thought. Thinking about the mind and thought processes of people can be a fun way to brainstorm characters into existence. In Annie Hall,
Alvie is a rational man who has bouts of irrationality. This surfaces when a cop pulls him over and he tears up his license. In Titanic Rose jumps from the lifeboat to return to Jack, a slightly more irrational than rational act — but hey, this is a love story, and romantic love is rooted as much in animal nature as it is in the higher mind. (Rose is also slightly larger than life, and she’s being consistent with what we’ve seen of her.)
“In summary, to create a real human being for an audi­ence you must have them do things that convince the au­dience that they are alive, really alive, giving details that even a scientist like Aristotle would appreciate.”

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Dan Chaon’s novel Ill Will Is Not for the Faint of Heart

Dan Chaon‘s book Ill Will is a beautifully written, dark, at times almost lyric portrayal of a man’s struggle to discern what is real and to confront his past. He is a therapist who grew up with a disturbed, abusive older adoptive brother, and whose parents were brutally murdered when he was a teenager. https://s3.amazonaws.com/netgalley-covers/cover99566-medium.png

Chaon’s novel follows two plot lines, the disintegration of the therapist’s own family after his wife dies, and the bizarre investigation by the therapist and one of his patients of a series of deaths. Told from multiple points of view and shifting frequently between past and present, the narrative is complex and engaging. It moves toward its conclusion driven by the inescapable, inexorable power of the past to control the present. The characters’ journeys are downward spirals right from the beginning.

Chaon offers a dark, almost despairing view of human nature. This book is not for the faint of heart.

Guest Blog Spots and Giveaways: Enter for a Chance to Win

I just want to be sure you are aware of a few opportunities that are part of my promotional campaign for my mystery/thriller novel Sacrificial Lam. I have a couple of guest blog spots today and a couple of giveaways going on.

You can check out the guest blog spots at these locations:

POTL: All Things Books, Reading and Publishing. Here’s the link.

My Writing Corner, with Rebecca Grace. Here’s the link.

You can find the giveaways at these locations:

Amazon, giving away five Kindle editions. Here’s the link.

Rafflecopter, giving away a signed paperback copy. Here’s the link.

Hope you enjoy the guest spots, and good luck with the giveaways.

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